Category Archives: Evangelism and Witnessing Tools

Links to sources to equip you for evangelizing, witnessing to those in false religions and unbelievers.

Home Team Huddle: Hints on How to do Family Devotions

Home Team Huddle: Hints on How to do Family Devotions

November 23, 2014

by Clint Archer

I have mentioned previously how my wife helped me to man-up and start to lead our family worship times. It was embarrassing that I needed the help, but like with the lady in our GPS unit, I’ve learned not to argue with the voice of reason.

Let me issue this vital disclaimer: I am no expert. I seriously have little to no idea what I’m doing. We haven’t been at this for years, but for the past few months it’s been pretty consistent. And our kids love family worship. They ask for it. That can’t be bad, right?

Also, we’ve only test-run this on tiny tots. My kids are 4.5, 2.5, and newborn (he’s just there as eye-candy, and so the other two remember to pray for the baby).

We’ve been at it for about 6 months.

So here is what we do, which may be of some help…

We use a routine. This has been the key to our consistency. I need this as much as the kids do. Every night after bath, before bed time, we gather in the same place, the couch in our living room. The kids have come to expect this, and often prompt me as I’m deliberating whether or not to use the precious ‘exception’ for when I’m exhausted. Turns out, their beaming expectant faces cures all fatigue. Exceptions are for the rare nights I’m out before the kid’s bedtime. Then Mom fills in the gap.

Dad reads a short Bible story from a children’s Bible. I try to be expressive and funny, with lots of voices and accents. We use the Big Picture Bible which emphasizes Christocentricity throughout the Scriptures. We also use the Jesus Storybook Bible, and the Word and Song Bible, and a couple of others. Select an age appropriate Bible. No ESV for 2 year olds. I hunt for Bibles that include the lesser-known passages like Naboth’s vineyard and the Witch of Endor. I usually check the flood story to see why God wiped out the world. Some say “To clean the planet.” Yuk. If it says to wipe out wickedness, now we’re cooking.

Dad draws one application. I do this by asking some simple, multiple choice question that starts, “Do we learn…” as in “Do we learn that God doesn’t mind our sin, or do we learn that God hates sin and wants to punish it?” For my older boy (4) I ask questions that probe deeper insight and I have been repeatedly blown away by his comprehension. Kid’s aren’t just sponges, they are processors. He once responded, “But if God hardened Pharaoh’s heart, why didn’t he un-harden it and give faith to the Egyptians also trust in the Passover lamb?” Unconditional Election. Yikes. Mom?

We all take turns praying for one thing we are thankful for and one need someone else has. If one of the kids has a need, we let the other one pray for that need. I’m not against personal petitions, but if the prayers get too long, they tend to derail. So we keep it simple.

We sing a song or two, or three. We try to teach them a song they hear in church, and sing it every night for a week or so, as well as another song they already know. Now we take requests. Oh Lord My God, You are Holy, I Lift My Eyes Up, and other deep songs are favorites. But we also try to do one lighter song with actions.

We keep it short. Seriously, this can make or break it. 10 minutes goes quickly with singing, praying, and story. And sometimes they beg for more. That’s a good sign. If they are gnawing at their wrists to end the misery of your 45 minute exposition, you know you’re making no impact.

We keep it light. The tone is light, fun, and expressive. When the subject matter is more somber, like discussing the crucifixion, we are more serious, but we end on a hopeful, joyful note.

We mix it up. We use the same Bible for a few nights in a row, and then change to another one. We rotate through four. We sometimes sing first or pray last, or whatever.

Let me know what you do. We can use all the help we can get.

I cover some more of this topic in my book, The Home Team: God’s Game Plan for the Family (Kindle or hardcopy).

http://thecripplegate.com/home-team-huddle-hints-on-how-to-do-family-devotions/

Home Team Huddle: Hints on How to do Family Devotions

Home Team Huddle: Hints on How to do Family Devotions

November 23, 2014

by Clint Archer

I have mentioned previously how my wife helped me to man-up and start to lead our family worship times. It was embarrassing that I needed the help, but like with the lady in our GPS unit, I’ve learned not to argue with the voice of reason.

Let me issue this vital disclaimer: I am no expert. I seriously have little to no idea what I’m doing. We haven’t been at this for years, but for the past few months it’s been pretty consistent. And our kids love family worship. They ask for it. That can’t be bad, right?

Also, we’ve only test-run this on tiny tots. My kids are 4.5, 2.5, and newborn (he’s just there as eye-candy, and so the other two remember to pray for the baby).

We’ve been at it for about 6 months.

So here is what we do, which may be of some help…

We use a routine. This has been the key to our consistency. I need this as much as the kids do. Every night after bath, before bed time, we gather in the same place, the couch in our living room. The kids have come to expect this, and often prompt me as I’m deliberating whether or not to use the precious ‘exception’ for when I’m exhausted. Turns out, their beaming expectant faces cures all fatigue. Exceptions are for the rare nights I’m out before the kid’s bedtime. Then Mom fills in the gap.

Dad reads a short Bible story from a children’s Bible. I try to be expressive and funny, with lots of voices and accents. We use the Big Picture Bible which emphasizes Christocentricity throughout the Scriptures. We also use the Jesus Storybook Bible, and the Word and Song Bible, and a couple of others. Select an age appropriate Bible. No ESV for 2 year olds. I hunt for Bibles that include the lesser-known passages like Naboth’s vineyard and the Witch of Endor. I usually check the flood story to see why God wiped out the world. Some say “To clean the planet.” Yuk. If it says to wipe out wickedness, now we’re cooking.

Dad draws one application. I do this by asking some simple, multiple choice question that starts, “Do we learn…” as in “Do we learn that God doesn’t mind our sin, or do we learn that God hates sin and wants to punish it?” For my older boy (4) I ask questions that probe deeper insight and I have been repeatedly blown away by his comprehension. Kid’s aren’t just sponges, they are processors. He once responded, “But if God hardened Pharaoh’s heart, why didn’t he un-harden it and give faith to the Egyptians also trust in the Passover lamb?” Unconditional Election. Yikes. Mom?

We all take turns praying for one thing we are thankful for and one need someone else has. If one of the kids has a need, we let the other one pray for that need. I’m not against personal petitions, but if the prayers get too long, they tend to derail. So we keep it simple.

We sing a song or two, or three. We try to teach them a song they hear in church, and sing it every night for a week or so, as well as another song they already know. Now we take requests. Oh Lord My God, You are Holy, I Lift My Eyes Up, and other deep songs are favorites. But we also try to do one lighter song with actions.

We keep it short. Seriously, this can make or break it. 10 minutes goes quickly with singing, praying, and story. And sometimes they beg for more. That’s a good sign. If they are gnawing at their wrists to end the misery of your 45 minute exposition, you know you’re making no impact.

We keep it light. The tone is light, fun, and expressive. When the subject matter is more somber, like discussing the crucifixion, we are more serious, but we end on a hopeful, joyful note.

We mix it up. We use the same Bible for a few nights in a row, and then change to another one. We rotate through four. We sometimes sing first or pray last, or whatever.

Let me know what you do. We can use all the help we can get.

I cover some more of this topic in my book, The Home Team: God’s Game Plan for the Family (Kindle or hardcopy).

http://thecripplegate.com/home-team-huddle-hints-on-how-to-do-family-devotions/

How to Share the Gospel with Gays, and Someone Who is About to Kill He

How to Share the Gospel with Gays, and Someone Who is About to Kill Her Baby

by Ray Comfort

May 13, 2013

I was flying from Los Angeles to Miami when I found myself sitting next to two women. Sarah was sitting closest to me. She was 29, inappropriately dressed, with a ring through her nose, and she wasn’t the friendliest person I have sat next to on a plane. After we took off I couldn’t help but notice that her friend kept kissing her on the cheek, holding her hand, and rubbing her shoulder. They were gay, and that little revelation lifted my planned witnessing encounter up a big notch on the awkward-meter. I really didn’t want an angry gay couple complaining to the airline (and the media) that I was a homophobic fundamentalist, imposing my hate-speech by saying that they were going to Hell because they were gay.

I waited until she had eaten, finished her movie, and simply said, “Sarah. I have a question for you. Do you think there’s an afterlife?” She wasn’t sure, so I asked, “If Heaven exists, are you going there? Are you a good person?” She predictably said she was, so I took her through three of the Ten Commandments—had she lied, stolen, and taken God’s name in vain? She had broken all three, so we then looked at whether or not she would be guilty on Judgment Day and whether she would go to Heaven or Hell. I then shared the cross, and the necessity for repentance and faith in Jesus. I didn’t mention her sexual orientation; I didn’t need to nor did I want to. I simply shared the moral Law (the Ten Commandments)—because the Bible says that the Law was “made” for homosexuals—see 1 Timothy 1:8-10. She wasn’t offended, and I kept her friendship and stayed out of jail.

Trying to witness to someone who is about to take the life of her child is also high on the awkward list. It’s awkward, mainly because the mind of this person is preoccupied with what she is about to do and therefore it’s difficult to get her attention. However, if she would stop and talk I would handle the situation similarly to my conversation with Sarah. The reason for that is that I don’t want to reform people. I didn’t want Sarah to stop being gay and end up in Hell for her lying, theft and blasphemy. I don’t want to just stop a woman from killing her child, and have her go to Hell for her other sins. With God’s help I want to see more than a change of mind. I want to see a change of heart.

Contrary to popular opinion, most who take the life of their child through abortion believe in God. Even the staunchest fundamentalist atheist believes in God. I know because I have an inside source. I have a “Whistle-blower.”

“For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse, because, although they knew God, they did not glorify Him as God, nor were thankful, but became futile in their thoughts, and their foolish hearts were darkened. Professing to be wise, they became fools…” (Romans 1:20-22).

Those who abort the life of their children are “idolaters,” illustrated in the fact that their god condones the taking of a human life. They have no fear of God before their eyes. So your agenda, with the help of God, is to stir her God-given conscience to do its duty and put the fear of God within her, and you can do that, as I did with Sarah and the gay issue, without even mentioning the elephant in the room—the impending abortion. To put the fear of God in someone means that you will have to stay with the biblical gospel. Do not use the “God has a wonderful plan” message because it is both unbiblical and will do more damage than good. If you really believe that that message is biblical, think for a few moments about how the first eleven disciples were murdered for their faith. If you know Church history, you will know that the foundation of the Church is founded in the blood of the saints. Jesus warned that people would kill Christians thinking that they are doing God a favor.

Imagine you have been asked to preach the gospel to 1,000 people on the 100th floor of the World Trade Center the night before 9/11. You know that within 24 hours every person looking at you will die a death so horrific it defies human imagination. Many will be burned alive. Others will jump 100 stories to their deaths on the unforgiving sidewalks of New York. Others will fall with the building and be so crushed that their bodies will never be recovered. What are you going to tell them—that God has a wonderful plan for their lives? You can’t say that to people who are about to die! Instead you would soberly tell them that it’s appointed to man once to die and after this, the judgment. You would tell them that God is holy, that He will judge them by His perfect Law, that Hell is very real and that they desperately need a Savior. You would tell them that they could die within 24 hours, and plead with them to repent and trust alone in Jesus. If you have to change the message you normally preach, then you are not preaching the biblical gospel. Why would you have a different message for people who are walking the streets of this world, and are about to die? Every day 150,000 people throughout this world pass into death, many of whom will die in terrible ways—through horrific car accidents and through the suffering of cancer.

Think of David and Nathan the prophet. David had coveted his neighbor’s wife, stolen her, lived a lie, committed adultery and murdered her husband. He had violated the Ten Commandments but he wasn’t too worried. His conscience wasn’t doing its duty. God had commissioned Nathan to expose the king’s terrible sin. So what did Nathan say? Did he say, “David, God has a wonderful plan for your life”? What has that got to do with anything? David was a criminal, and Nathan was there to expose his crimes, not speak of some wonderful plan. The faithful preacher began in the natural realm with a story about the theft and slaughter of a poor man’s lamb, and when David became indignant about that man’s sin, Nathan said, “YOU are that man. Why have you despised the Commandment of the Lord!” And that’s when David cried, “I have sinned against God.” Think for a moment as to whether or not the wonderful plan message could never have elicited that response. Why should it? It doesn’t bring any knowledge of sin or the fear of God. It doesn’t stir the conscience. But the Law does. It made David tremble. The Law stirred the king’s seared conscience so that it would do its God-given duty, and we can see its result in the penitent prayer of Psalm 51. And that’s what we must do with those who see nothing wrong with the taking of the life of their unborn child. Their terrible sin must be made personal so that the fear of the Lord causes them to depart from it. The instant someone is converted to Jesus Christ they know that means no more lying, stealing, lust, pornography, homosexuality, fornication, adultery, idolatry and no murdering of your own children.

In Mark 10:17 we are told of the story of the rich young ruler who ran to Jesus, kneeled down and said, “Good master. What must I do to inherit eternal life?” He ran (was earnest), he kneeled down (he was humble), and he asked the question we so wish the world would ask, “What must I do to inherit eternal life?” But instead of leading him in a sinner’s prayer, Jesus reproved him of his use of the word “good.” Proverbs 20:6 says, “Most men will proclaim each his own goodness,” and they certainly do. Ask anyone if they think they are a good person and most will say that they are. So Jesus used the Ten Commandments to bring the knowledge of sin to show him that he wasn’t good at all. He, like Nathan, made sin personal. Paul did this in Romans 2 when he said, “You who say you shall not steal; do YOU steal? You who say you shall not commit adultery, do YOU commit adultery?” Such faithful talk will cause the sinner to tremble as Felix trembled when Paul reasoned with him—not about some wonderful plan, but of “sin, temperance and judgment.”

The stirring of the dormant conscience coupled with a knowledge that a holy God will hold her accountable should be enough to put the fear of God within someone who is about to commit the murder of her own offspring. May God help us to be faithful, courageous, and give us wisdom and help us to stop such slaughter.

You can learn how to do this through free resources on www.livingwaters.com

THE GOSPEL OF JESUS CHRIST

THE GOSPEL OF JESUS CHRIST

The Character of God

The Holiness of God

Your eyes are too pure to approve evil, and You cannot look on wickedness with favor. Habakkuk 1:13

But your iniquities have made a separation between you and your God, and your sins have hidden His face from you so that He does not hear. Isaiah 59:2

The Justice of God

For the LORD is righteous, He loves righteousness; the upright will behold His face. Psalm 11:7

But the LORD of hosts will be exalted in judgment, and the holy God will show Himself holy in righteousness. Isaiah 5:16

God is a righteous judge, and a God who has indignation every day. If a man does not repent, He will sharpen His sword; He has bent His bow and made it ready. Psalm 7:11-12

The Depravity & Condemnation of Man

For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. Romans 3:23

For all of us have become like one who is unclean, and all our righteous deeds are like a filthy garment Isaiah 64:6

For as many as are of the works of the law are under a curse; for it is written, ACCURSED IS EVERYONE WHO DOES NOT ABIDE BY ALL THINGS WRITTEN IN THE BOOK OF THE LAW, TO PERFORM THEM. Galatians 3:10

The Great Dilemma

He who justifies the wicked and he who condemns the righteous, both of them alike are an abomination to the LORD. Proverbs 17:15

Far be it from You to do such a thing, to slay the righteous with the wicked, so that the righteous and the wicked are treated alike. Far be it from You! Shall not the Judge of all the earth deal justly? Genesis 18:25

God’s Action

While maintaining His holiness and justice, the Bible also affirms that God is love, and that in love He has responded to the plight of man.

Motivated by Love

God is love. By this the love of God is manifested in us, that God sent His only begotten Son into the world so that we might live through Him. In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. 1 John 4:8-10

The Cross of Christ

For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, being justified as a gift by His grace through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus; whom God displayed publicly as a propitiation in His blood through faith. This was to demonstrate His righteousness, because in the forbearance of God He passed over the sins previously committed; for the demonstration, I say, of His righteousness at the present time, so that He would be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus. Romans 3:23-26

The Resurrection

He who was delivered over because of our transgressions, and was raised because of our justification. Romans 4:25

Man’s Response

Repentance begins with a recognition and confession that what God says

about us is true that we have sinned.

For I know my transgressions, and my sin is ever before me. Against You, You only, I have sinned and done what is evil in Your sight, so

that You are justified when You speak and blameless when You judge. Psalm 51:3-4

A genuine recognition of our sinfulness and guilt will also lead to genuine sorrow, shame and even hatred for what we have done.

For what I am doing, I do not understand; for I am not practicing what I would like to do, but I am doing the very thing I hate. Romans 7:15

Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from this body of death? Romans 7:24

Apparent sincerity of confession alone is never definite evidence of genuine repentance. It must be accompanied by a turning away from sin.

Wash yourselves, make yourselves clean; remove the evil of your deeds from My sight. Cease to do evil. Isaiah 1:16

therefore every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. Matthew 3:10

Faith Defined

Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. Hebrews 11:1

and being fully assured that what God had promised, He was able also to perform. Romans 4:21

Faith Based on The Promises of God

For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life. John 3:16

Believe in the Lord Jesus, and you will be saved Acts 16:31

Example of a Believer

worship in the Spirit of God and glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh Philippians 3:3

The Basis of Genuine Assurance

True conversion: A true Christian is a new creation and will live a life that reflects God’s radical work of re-creation in his/her life. Therefore if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creature; the old things passed away; behold, new things have come. 2 Corinthians 5:17

You will know them by their fruits. Grapes are not gathered from thorn bushes nor figs from thistles, are they? Matthew 7:16

Assurance is based upon self-examination in the light of Scripture. Test yourselves to see if you are in the faith; examine yourselves! Or do you not recognize this about yourselves, that Jesus Christ is in you unless indeed you fail the test? 2 Corinthians 13:5

These things I have written to you who believe in the name of the Son of God, so that you may know that you have eternal life. 1 John 5:13

Test of Biblical Assurance

1 John 1:5-7 (Walking in the Light), 1 John 1:8-10 (Confession of Sin), 1 John 2:3-4 (Obedience), 1 John 2:9-11 (Love for the Brethren), 1 John 2:15-17 (Hatred for the World), 1 John 2:24-25 (Perseverance in Doctrine), 1 John 3:10 (Righteousness), 1 John 4:13 (Spirit’s Testimony), Hebrews 12:5-8 (Discipline)

http://www.heartcrymissionary.com/resources/the-gospel-of-jesus-christ

* feel free to print out the above- permission from HeartCry granted.

The (Lost) Art of Street Preaching — Must It Be Resurrected?

The (Lost) Art of Street Preaching — Must It Be Resurrected?

by Geoffrey Kirkland

You may have a particular view on street-preaching (for purposes here, street preaching and open air preaching are synonymous). This could be from a street preacher that you heard or from a YouTube video that you watched, or just the seemingly “weird” people that do it. I want to propose today that this art of public open-air preaching is an important way the gospel of Jesus Christ can effectively be proclaimed to the lost in our culture.

I propose nine reasons why street-preaching should be considered as a valid way to present the gospel of Jesus Christ.

1. It presents the gospel to people who may not otherwise step foot into a church.

Many people in our day and age refuse to step foot in a church. This may result from a myriad of reasons. But one undeniable benefit of open-air preaching is that instead of waiting for the people to come into the church, the preacher goes out to the lost. Thus, those people who may not enter into a church building can hear the gospel proclaimed to them in an area or setting in which they gather. Rightly did Spurgeon remark regarding preachers of the gospel: “traders go to the markets, they follow their customers and go out after business if it will not come to them; and so must we.”

2. It allows the preacher to obey the most frequent command regarding the manner in which the gospel is presented.

One only needs to read through the Scriptures (both OT and NT) to find the clear emphasis on the bold, public, and even at times “in-the-moment” proclamation of God’s truth. A concept that very frequently arises is the command given and pattern exemplified in the act of preaching the Gospel and proclaiming the truth of salvation (cf. Acts 26; 2 Tim 4:2; Luke 14:23; cp. Neh 8).

3. It follows the historical pattern of pastors open air preaching.

Beginning with Noah who was a preacher of righteousness (2 Pet 2:5), to Ezra (Neh 8:1-4), to Jeremiah (Jer 7:2; 19:2), Ezekiel (Ezek 11:off), other prophets (cf. Jonah 3:2-4), John the Baptist (Matt 3:1-2), our Lord Jesus Christ (Matt 5-7, et al.), Paul (Acts 26), Peter (Acts 5:17ff), and hundreds through Church history, an unbroken pattern of open-air preaching can be observed. For instance, in the 18th century, Gideon Ouseley, heralded God’s truth in the open-air in the country of Ireland. Ouseley first preached in a church-yard, at a funeral, and after this point, he preached in the streets and church-yards, at fairs and markets, at wakes and funerals, wherever in fact he could find a congregation assembled. He would ride on his horse from county to county preaching and exhorting wherever and whenever he could.

Even Spurgeon provided a list of eleven qualifications for open-air preachers: (1) a good voice, (2) naturalness of manner, (3) self-possession, (4) a good knowledge of Scripture and of common things, (5) ability to adapt himself to any congregation, (6) good illustrative powers, (7) zeal, prudence, and common sense, (8) a large, loving heart, (9) sincere belief in all he says, (10) entire dependence on the Holy Spirit for success, (11) a close walk with God by prayer, and (12) a consistent walk before men by a holy life.

4. It plainly understands the command of our Lord to “go into the highways and the country roads” and compel sinners to come.

In Luke 14:23, Jesus commanded His disciples to go out into the highways and the country roads (or, hedges) and compel sinners to come in so that His house may be full. Open-air preachers take this verse and read it at face value and have no need to spiritualize or take this text figuratively. O how important it is to go out to where the sinners are, gather, commune, party, and live so that the biblical gospel is presented to them in a winsome and compelling way so that they may repent of their sin and believe in Christ.

5. It trusts wholly that God’s Word will never return void.

Every time the preacher heralds God’s truth, he recognizes that God’s truth never returns void. It especially is the case when the open-air preacher takes God’s Word and delivers it to the passers-by that an unshakable trust in God’s promise that His Word will never return empty but it will always accomplish what God sovereignly ordains.

6. It encourages believers to go out together as a team and it mutually stirs others to more fervent and urgent evangelism.

Open-air preaching can provide a great opportunity to take other believers from a local church to gather and hand out tracts and to approach people who have listened to the preaching of the Gospel and engage in further conversation. It can be an effective way of openly proclaiming the Word and deliberately engaging people in personal conversation about their own heart and soul before a sovereign Judge.

7. It convicts Christian passers-by who are not sharing their faith to consider evangelizing with greater zeal.

Oftentimes, the open-air preacher will hear from Christians who walk by and say something along the lines of: “I wish I could do what you’re doing,” or “I could never do that!” but this allows the preacher a great opportunity to challenge those passers-by to be diligent, vigilant, and urgent in their own gospel-proclamation in the life-setting in which God has placed them. By the preacher’s urgency and intensity, he reproves other Christians who wonder if God may ever put them up to such a daunting task of evangelizing in public! The open air preacher must, from beginning to end, be an intense man and preach with urgency, intensity, and bulldog tenacity. And, it could be argued, he could shepherd other Christians to do the same in their evangelism.

8. It always glorifies God because His Word is being proclaimed.

When a man of God proclaims the Word of God that salvation is found in the one true God, Jesus Christ, and in His righteousness received by faith alone, God is always glorified. He can be glorified in the drawing of sinners to repentance or He can be glorified in the hardening of sinners further toward judgment. God’s Word that is faithfully proclaimed always glorifies God even if the outward results are nonexistent.

9. It depends wholly on the sovereign Work of the Holy Spirit to quicken dead hearts to new life as sinners hear the word preached.

Preaching by definition takes the divine message and preaches that message of new life to dead sinners who cannot, in and of themselves, listen to, hear, and respond to new life. They simply can’t believe by their own freewill. The open-air preacher heralds God’s truth anywhere and everywhere depending wholly on the sovereign work of God the Holy Spirit to awaken spiritually dead souls and impart spiritually new life into the sinner’s soul. This is the divine act of regeneration. God can do it from the pulpit in a church. And God can perform this sovereign act on a streetcorner in a public square.

A concluding thought comes poignantly from Spurgeon:

“No sort of defence [sic] is needed for preaching out of doors; but it would need very potent arguments to prove that a man had done his duty who has never preached beyond the walls of his meeting-house.”

http://thecripplegate.com/the-lost-art-of-street-preaching-must-it-be-resurrected/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheCripplegate+%28The+Cripplegate%29