Egypt's highest ranking Muslim cleric wants all Jews removed from Jeru

Egypt’s highest ranking Muslim cleric wants all Jews removed from Jerusalem

October 31, 2014

Ahmed a- Taib, the highest ranking cleric in Egypt and one of the most important clerics in the entire Sunni Arab world, has called on all Muslims who value their religion, to join him in his effort to stop the Judaization of Jerusalem. A- Taib has set up a special committee to prevent the progress of the Zionist plan to Judaize Jeruslaem and the Islamic cleric has called on all Muslim leaders to commit to using whatever sources that they have at their disposal to defend al Aksa Mosque on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

Jimmy’s Prophetic Prospective on the News

The call by an Egyptian Muslim cleric to liberate the city of Jerusalem is a call to arms in the Islamic world but it is also a page out of Bible prophecy for the last days.

The highest ranking Muslim cleric in Egypt and perhaps the entire Sunni Arab world has set in motion a plan to remove all Jews from the city of Jerusalem. Underneath the banner of a campaign to stop the Judaization of Jerusalem, Ahmed a- Taib has called on all Muslims everywhere to join his efforts to remove Jews from Jerusalem and to use every source at their disposal to achieve their goal. A meeting between A- Taib and the leaders of the Islamic terror group Hamas brought a strategy together for achieving their goal of a Jew free Jerusalem. This report is tangible evidence of how the prophetic scenario found in Bible prophecy is quickly approaching the fulfillment on each of the prophecies related to the city of Jerusalem.

Zechariah 12:2 says that in the last days Jerusalem will be the center of controversy. The Davidic Covenant found in II Samuel 7 reveals that the Lord will place the Jews in Jerusalem forever and there He will protect them from all of their enemies. Jesus Christ said that He would return to Jerusalem (Zechariah 14:4) and there build a temple where He will rule and reign forever (Zechariah 6:12-13). Jerusalem is the place where the Lord said that He would dwell among His people, the Jewish people, forever (Psalm 132:13-14).

No Muslim cleric or anyone else for that matter can stop Bible prophecy from being fulfilled.

http://news.prophecytoday.com/

Egypt's highest ranking Muslim cleric wants all Jews removed from Jeru

Egypt’s highest ranking Muslim cleric wants all Jews removed from Jerusalem

October 31, 2014

Ahmed a- Taib, the highest ranking cleric in Egypt and one of the most important clerics in the entire Sunni Arab world, has called on all Muslims who value their religion, to join him in his effort to stop the Judaization of Jerusalem. A- Taib has set up a special committee to prevent the progress of the Zionist plan to Judaize Jeruslaem and the Islamic cleric has called on all Muslim leaders to commit to using whatever sources that they have at their disposal to defend al Aksa Mosque on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

Jimmy’s Prophetic Prospective on the News

The call by an Egyptian Muslim cleric to liberate the city of Jerusalem is a call to arms in the Islamic world but it is also a page out of Bible prophecy for the last days.

The highest ranking Muslim cleric in Egypt and perhaps the entire Sunni Arab world has set in motion a plan to remove all Jews from the city of Jerusalem. Underneath the banner of a campaign to stop the Judaization of Jerusalem, Ahmed a- Taib has called on all Muslims everywhere to join his efforts to remove Jews from Jerusalem and to use every source at their disposal to achieve their goal. A meeting between A- Taib and the leaders of the Islamic terror group Hamas brought a strategy together for achieving their goal of a Jew free Jerusalem. This report is tangible evidence of how the prophetic scenario found in Bible prophecy is quickly approaching the fulfillment on each of the prophecies related to the city of Jerusalem.

Zechariah 12:2 says that in the last days Jerusalem will be the center of controversy. The Davidic Covenant found in II Samuel 7 reveals that the Lord will place the Jews in Jerusalem forever and there He will protect them from all of their enemies. Jesus Christ said that He would return to Jerusalem (Zechariah 14:4) and there build a temple where He will rule and reign forever (Zechariah 6:12-13). Jerusalem is the place where the Lord said that He would dwell among His people, the Jewish people, forever (Psalm 132:13-14).

No Muslim cleric or anyone else for that matter can stop Bible prophecy from being fulfilled.

http://news.prophecytoday.com/

October 31, 2014 Bible Reading

October 31

Reading for Today:

Jeremiah 47:1–48:47

Psalm 119:113-120

Proverbs 28:5

2 Timothy 4:1-22

Notes:

Jeremiah 48:11, 12- This wine-making imagery is vivid. In the production of sweet wine, the juice was left in a wineskin until the sediment or dregs settled onto the bottom. Then it was poured into another skin until more dregs were separated. This process continued until the dregs were all removed and a pure, sweet wine obtained. Moab was not taken from suffering to suffering so that her bitter dregs would be removed through the purging of pain. Thus the nation was settled into the thickness and bitterness of its own sin. Judgment from God was coming to smash them.

2 Timothy 4:2- the word. The entire written Word of God, His complete revealed truth as contained in the Bible (3:15, 16; Acts 20:27). Be ready. The Greek word has a broad range of meanings, including suddenness or forcefulness. Here the form of the verb suggests the complementary ideas of urgency, preparedness, and readiness. It was used of a soldier prepared to go into battle or a guard who was continually alert for any surprise attack—attitudes which are imperative for a faithful preacher. in season and out of season. The faithful preacher must proclaim the Word when it is popular and/or convenient and when it is not; when it seems suitable to do so and when it seems not. The dictates of popular culture, tradition, reputation, acceptance, or esteem in the community (or in the church) must never alter the true preacher’s commitment to proclaim God’s Word. Convince, rebuke. The negative side of preaching the Word (the “reproof” and “correction”; 3:16). The Greek word for “convince” refers to correcting behavior or false doctrine by using careful biblical argument to help a person understand the error of his actions. The Greek word for “rebuke” deals more with correcting the person’s motives by convicting him of his sin and leading him to repentance.

DAY 31: Describe how Paul recaps his life in 2 Timothy 4:6–8.

“For I am already being poured out as a drink offering” (v. 6). Meaning his death was imminent. In the Old Testament sacrificial system, a drink offering was the final offering that followed the burnt and grain offerings prescribed for the people of Israel (Num. 15:1–16). Paul saw his coming death as his final offering to God in a life that had already been full of sacrifices to Him. “My departure” speaks of Paul’s death. The Greek word essentially refers to the loosening of something, such as the mooring ropes of a ship or the ropes of a tent; thus it eventually acquired the secondary meaning of “departure.”

“I have fought…have finished…have kept” (v. 7). The form of the 3 Greek verbs indicates completed action with continuing results. Paul saw his life as complete—he had been able to accomplish through the Lord’s power all that God called him to do. He was a soldier, an athlete, and a guardian. “The faith.” The truths and standards of the revealed Word of God.

“Finally, there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness” (v. 8). The Greek word for “crown” literally means “surrounding,” and it was used of the plaited wreaths or garlands placed on the heads of dignitaries and victorious military officers or athletes. Linguistically, “of righteousness” can mean either that righteousness is the source of the crown or that righteousness is the nature of the crown. The crown represents eternal righteousness received through the imputed righteousness of Christ at salvation (Rom. 4:6, 11). The Holy Spirit works practical righteousness (sanctification) in the believer throughout his lifetime of struggle with sin (Rom. 6:13, 19; 8:4). But only when the struggle is complete will the Christian receive Christ’s righteousness perfected in him (glorification) when he enters heaven (Gal. 5:5).

http://www.gty.org/resources/devotionals/daily-bible

October 31, 2014 Bible Reading

October 31

Reading for Today:

Jeremiah 47:1–48:47

Psalm 119:113-120

Proverbs 28:5

2 Timothy 4:1-22

Notes:

Jeremiah 48:11, 12- This wine-making imagery is vivid. In the production of sweet wine, the juice was left in a wineskin until the sediment or dregs settled onto the bottom. Then it was poured into another skin until more dregs were separated. This process continued until the dregs were all removed and a pure, sweet wine obtained. Moab was not taken from suffering to suffering so that her bitter dregs would be removed through the purging of pain. Thus the nation was settled into the thickness and bitterness of its own sin. Judgment from God was coming to smash them.

2 Timothy 4:2- the word. The entire written Word of God, His complete revealed truth as contained in the Bible (3:15, 16; Acts 20:27). Be ready. The Greek word has a broad range of meanings, including suddenness or forcefulness. Here the form of the verb suggests the complementary ideas of urgency, preparedness, and readiness. It was used of a soldier prepared to go into battle or a guard who was continually alert for any surprise attack—attitudes which are imperative for a faithful preacher. in season and out of season. The faithful preacher must proclaim the Word when it is popular and/or convenient and when it is not; when it seems suitable to do so and when it seems not. The dictates of popular culture, tradition, reputation, acceptance, or esteem in the community (or in the church) must never alter the true preacher’s commitment to proclaim God’s Word. Convince, rebuke. The negative side of preaching the Word (the “reproof” and “correction”; 3:16). The Greek word for “convince” refers to correcting behavior or false doctrine by using careful biblical argument to help a person understand the error of his actions. The Greek word for “rebuke” deals more with correcting the person’s motives by convicting him of his sin and leading him to repentance.

DAY 31: Describe how Paul recaps his life in 2 Timothy 4:6–8.

“For I am already being poured out as a drink offering” (v. 6). Meaning his death was imminent. In the Old Testament sacrificial system, a drink offering was the final offering that followed the burnt and grain offerings prescribed for the people of Israel (Num. 15:1–16). Paul saw his coming death as his final offering to God in a life that had already been full of sacrifices to Him. “My departure” speaks of Paul’s death. The Greek word essentially refers to the loosening of something, such as the mooring ropes of a ship or the ropes of a tent; thus it eventually acquired the secondary meaning of “departure.”

“I have fought…have finished…have kept” (v. 7). The form of the 3 Greek verbs indicates completed action with continuing results. Paul saw his life as complete—he had been able to accomplish through the Lord’s power all that God called him to do. He was a soldier, an athlete, and a guardian. “The faith.” The truths and standards of the revealed Word of God.

“Finally, there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness” (v. 8). The Greek word for “crown” literally means “surrounding,” and it was used of the plaited wreaths or garlands placed on the heads of dignitaries and victorious military officers or athletes. Linguistically, “of righteousness” can mean either that righteousness is the source of the crown or that righteousness is the nature of the crown. The crown represents eternal righteousness received through the imputed righteousness of Christ at salvation (Rom. 4:6, 11). The Holy Spirit works practical righteousness (sanctification) in the believer throughout his lifetime of struggle with sin (Rom. 6:13, 19; 8:4). But only when the struggle is complete will the Christian receive Christ’s righteousness perfected in him (glorification) when he enters heaven (Gal. 5:5).

http://www.gty.org/resources/devotionals/daily-bible

Training in Righteousness

Training in Righteousness

[COLOR=Red]”All Scripture is . . . profitable for . . . training in righteousness” (2 Tim. 3:16).

We conclude our study of the character and benefits of God’s Word by focusing on the benefit that ties all the others together: training in righteousness. Everything the Word accomplishes in you through teaching, reproof, and correction is aimed at increasing your righteousness so you’ll “be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Tim. 3:17, NIV).

“Training” refers to training or educating a child. The New Testament also uses the term to speak of chastening, which is another important element in both child rearing and spiritual growth (Heb. 12:5-11). The idea is that from spiritual infancy to maturity, Scripture trains and educates believers in godly living.

Scripture is your spiritual nourishment. Jesus said, “Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God” (Matt. 4:4). Peter exhorted us to be like newborn babes, longing “for the pure milk of the word, that by it [we] may grow in respect to salvation” (1 Pet. 2:2).

You should crave the Word just like a baby craves milk. But Peter prefaced that statement with an exhortation to put “aside all malice and all guile and hypocrisy and envy and all slander” (v. 1). That’s the prerequisite. James taught the same principle: “Putting aside all filthiness and all that remains of wickedness, in humility receive the word” (James 1:21). Attempting to feast on Scripture without confessing your sin is like attempting to eat a meal while wearing a muzzle.

Either the Word will keep you from sin or sin will keep you from the Word. Deal with sin immediately so it doesn’t spoil your appetite for God’s Word. And even if you know the Bible well, be regularly refreshed by its power and reminded of its truths. That’s the key to enjoying spiritual health and victory.

Suggestions for Prayer:

Thank God for the nourishment His Word provides.

Seek His wisdom and grace in dealing with personal sin. Don’t ignore it, for it will diminish your desire for biblical truth.

For Further Study:

Read Philippians 3:1 and 2 Peter 1:12-15.

What did Paul and Peter say about the importance of being reminded of biblical truths you’ve already learned?

Do you follow that advice?

From Drawing Near by John MacArthur Copyright © 1993. Used by permission of Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton, IL 60187, www.crossway.com.[/COLOR]

http://www.gty.org/resources/devotionals

Training in Righteousness

Training in Righteousness

[COLOR=Red]”All Scripture is . . . profitable for . . . training in righteousness” (2 Tim. 3:16).

We conclude our study of the character and benefits of God’s Word by focusing on the benefit that ties all the others together: training in righteousness. Everything the Word accomplishes in you through teaching, reproof, and correction is aimed at increasing your righteousness so you’ll “be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Tim. 3:17, NIV).

“Training” refers to training or educating a child. The New Testament also uses the term to speak of chastening, which is another important element in both child rearing and spiritual growth (Heb. 12:5-11). The idea is that from spiritual infancy to maturity, Scripture trains and educates believers in godly living.

Scripture is your spiritual nourishment. Jesus said, “Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God” (Matt. 4:4). Peter exhorted us to be like newborn babes, longing “for the pure milk of the word, that by it [we] may grow in respect to salvation” (1 Pet. 2:2).

You should crave the Word just like a baby craves milk. But Peter prefaced that statement with an exhortation to put “aside all malice and all guile and hypocrisy and envy and all slander” (v. 1). That’s the prerequisite. James taught the same principle: “Putting aside all filthiness and all that remains of wickedness, in humility receive the word” (James 1:21). Attempting to feast on Scripture without confessing your sin is like attempting to eat a meal while wearing a muzzle.

Either the Word will keep you from sin or sin will keep you from the Word. Deal with sin immediately so it doesn’t spoil your appetite for God’s Word. And even if you know the Bible well, be regularly refreshed by its power and reminded of its truths. That’s the key to enjoying spiritual health and victory.

Suggestions for Prayer:

Thank God for the nourishment His Word provides.

Seek His wisdom and grace in dealing with personal sin. Don’t ignore it, for it will diminish your desire for biblical truth.

For Further Study:

Read Philippians 3:1 and 2 Peter 1:12-15.

What did Paul and Peter say about the importance of being reminded of biblical truths you’ve already learned?

Do you follow that advice?

From Drawing Near by John MacArthur Copyright © 1993. Used by permission of Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton, IL 60187, www.crossway.com.[/COLOR]

http://www.gty.org/resources/devotionals

An assassination attempt on a Jewish Temple Mount activist by a Muslim

An assassination attempt on a Jewish Temple Mount activist by a Muslim Radical has resulted in the closure of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem

October 30, 2014

The Temple Mount in Jerusalem has been closed to all visitors – Muslims, Jews and Christians – because of an attempted assassination on one of the leading Jewish Temple Mount activist.

With more on this story here is Jim DeYoung, Jr. in Jerusalem.

Jim DeYoung, Jr.: Rabbi Yehuda Glick who founded and heads the LIBA initiative for Jewish freedom on the Temple Mount was shot in the chest on Wednesday night outside the Begin Heritage Center in Jerusalem, after the shooter pulled up on a motorcycle and confirmed the identity before shooting.

Rabbi Glick had been speaking minutes before being shot at an event for Jewish Rights on the Temple Mount, that had hosted leading religious figures and members of Knesset. Likud member of Knesset Moshe Feiglin was with Glick when he was shot.

The 50-year-old advocate for Jewish Rights at Judaism’s Holiest site is in critical but stable condition, according to Shaare Zedek Hospital, Islamic Jihad has just confirmed official responsibility for the attack; meanwhile, the Temple Mount remains closed to all visitors – Jewish, Muslim or Christians.

Police and border patrol are deployed in the neighborhood and throughout the city to maintain security.

Dr. Jimmy DeYoung: Jerusalem Police believe there will be violence surrounding the Temple Mount and are prepared for what may follow.

Jimmy’s Prophetic Prospective on the News

An assassination attempt on a Jewish activist who wants to be able to pray on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem is a precursor for the fulfillment of Bible prophecy.

Yehuda Glick, former director of the Temple Institute, the people preparing to build a Temple on the Temple Mount, and who is now leading a campaign to be able to have access to the Temple Mount for Jewish people, but also be allowed to pray on Judaism’s most sacred piece of real estate; has been gunned down by a radical Muslim, this is evidence that control of the Temple Mount is going to be an ongoing battle.

Zechariah, the ancient Jewish prophet some 2,500 years ago said that the Temple Mount would be the center of controversy in the Last Days, Zechariah 12:2. In Zechariah 1:14, the Lord said that He was jealous for Jerusalem, actually aggressively possessive of this piece of real estate and that He would return to the earth and build His Temple where He will rule and reign forever there on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

http://news.prophecytoday.com/2014_10_30_archive.html

An assassination attempt on a Jewish Temple Mount activist by a Muslim

An assassination attempt on a Jewish Temple Mount activist by a Muslim Radical has resulted in the closure of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem

October 30, 2014

The Temple Mount in Jerusalem has been closed to all visitors – Muslims, Jews and Christians – because of an attempted assassination on one of the leading Jewish Temple Mount activist.

With more on this story here is Jim DeYoung, Jr. in Jerusalem.

Jim DeYoung, Jr.: Rabbi Yehuda Glick who founded and heads the LIBA initiative for Jewish freedom on the Temple Mount was shot in the chest on Wednesday night outside the Begin Heritage Center in Jerusalem, after the shooter pulled up on a motorcycle and confirmed the identity before shooting.

Rabbi Glick had been speaking minutes before being shot at an event for Jewish Rights on the Temple Mount, that had hosted leading religious figures and members of Knesset. Likud member of Knesset Moshe Feiglin was with Glick when he was shot.

The 50-year-old advocate for Jewish Rights at Judaism’s Holiest site is in critical but stable condition, according to Shaare Zedek Hospital, Islamic Jihad has just confirmed official responsibility for the attack; meanwhile, the Temple Mount remains closed to all visitors – Jewish, Muslim or Christians.

Police and border patrol are deployed in the neighborhood and throughout the city to maintain security.

Dr. Jimmy DeYoung: Jerusalem Police believe there will be violence surrounding the Temple Mount and are prepared for what may follow.

Jimmy’s Prophetic Prospective on the News

An assassination attempt on a Jewish activist who wants to be able to pray on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem is a precursor for the fulfillment of Bible prophecy.

Yehuda Glick, former director of the Temple Institute, the people preparing to build a Temple on the Temple Mount, and who is now leading a campaign to be able to have access to the Temple Mount for Jewish people, but also be allowed to pray on Judaism’s most sacred piece of real estate; has been gunned down by a radical Muslim, this is evidence that control of the Temple Mount is going to be an ongoing battle.

Zechariah, the ancient Jewish prophet some 2,500 years ago said that the Temple Mount would be the center of controversy in the Last Days, Zechariah 12:2. In Zechariah 1:14, the Lord said that He was jealous for Jerusalem, actually aggressively possessive of this piece of real estate and that He would return to the earth and build His Temple where He will rule and reign forever there on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

http://news.prophecytoday.com/2014_10_30_archive.html

One Way Love, Inexhaustible Grace for An Exhausted World

One Way Love, Inexhaustible Grace for An Exhausted World

by Tullian Tchividjian

(Colorado Springs: David C. Cook, 2013) 236 pp., paper $14.99

Tchividjian is tired and exhausted (pp. 28, 198) and believes that others are too in their attempts to perform up to God’s standards (pp. 20-22, 62, 147). Many, he believes, think that God loves them only if they are changing and growing (pp. 30, 52, 199) and thus they conceive of God’s love as conditional (pp. 30, 52, 199). The author thinks that Jesus came to liberate us from this demand to measure up (p. 36). And since even when we are at our best we do things that need forgiveness (p. 54), our only hope is found in God’s grace. Instead of living by grace most Christians apparently operate on the basis of law, attempting to follow a set of rules to obtain the favor of God. But instead of improving, people get worse when the law is laid down, for law reveals sin but is powerless to remove it (p. 91). What we must understand is that everything we need is found in Christ (p. 188) and, therefore, our lives rest on God’s love of us, not on our love for Him (p. 115).

Tchividjian is rightly concerned that we should not preach “humanity and it improved” instead of “Christ and Him crucified” (p. 131). In all of this he is not against obedience (p. 129) or even rules, which he sees as necessary for life to function. But keeping rules (p. 194) is not a condition for God’s approval (p. 155). Good works are important however, but not for God. Rather they are important to our neighbors (pp. 200-202).

In all of the things Tchivijian is on the mark but there are concerns:

1. He often makes unbalanced statements such as.

“Grace doesn’t make demands, it just gives” (p. 33). Yet God makes demands, for example, after detailing God’s grace in Ephesians 1-3 Paul immediately writes, “I implore you to walk in a manner worthy of your calling” (4:1).

He quotes Steve Brown claiming that children who run from grace always come back (p. 57). Really? Always?

We apparently will never be grateful because we are told to be (p. 153), yet does not God command us to be thankful (Col 3:15-17)? Did the Lord not know that commands are bad motivators and produce legalists?

The author claims grace got Jesus killed (pp. 170-174), but the Gospels present other motives, such as claiming to be God, challenging the power structure in Israel, and exposing the sins of spiritual leaders.

His claim that “moralism will produce immorality” (p. 193) is a strange and unprovable comment.

His statement that “only unbelief is called sin by Christ” fails to note Jesus’ condemnation of many sins (see Matt 5-7, 23). Others could be cited but these communicate the idea.

2. Tchividjian forces grace into biblical accounts where better explanations are at least debatable. Was it really on the basis of grace, as the author claims, that the Prodigal Son was given his inheritance (p. 42)? And does God forgive unconditionally—without repentance (p. 175)? First John 1:9 seems to contradict this when it lays down the condition of confession for forgiveness.

3. Attempting to explain or define grace is a problem it seems (see pp. 103-104), so the author most often turns to examples from his experience and many of these examples give us deep pause. Tchividjian believes it was grace to give his disobedient son his phone back after open defiance (pp. 160-162), and it was grace for a friend to buy his son a new car after he got drunk and wrecked his old one (pp. 164-165). And it was grace for his father to give him blank checks to fund his rebellious lifestyle as a young man (p. 56). Whether these are examples of grace or bad judgment could be debated, but of course in these stories all turned out well. However, this is basing our actions on pragmatism not Scripture (pp. 186-187). And in what world are Mel Gibson and Bernie Madoff examples of those whom God has pursued to give His grace (p. 132)? In this regard it was sad to see [COLOR=Green]Tchividjian trot out Brennan Manning as a champion of grace[/COLOR] (pp. 43-44, 210, 226). For the author to even consider Manning, a former Roman Catholic priest, a Christian calls into question his understanding of the gospel.

4. Tchividjian makes a number of excellent observations about law, especially offering Machen’s quote “A low view of law always produces legalism—a high view of law makes a person a seeker after grace” (p. 96). And he rightly shows that law cannot heal us spiritually, rather it exposes us and informs us of God’s nature. But if God’s commands backfire and actually provide the opposite of their intention has God failed when He makes demands? This is at least implied in Tchividjian’s comments concerning God giving the law to Israel, Jesus demanding his disciples to take up their cross, Paul’s criticism of the Corinthians, and even the initial prohibition to Adam and Eve (pp. 86-87). Doesn’t the Lord understand law and human nature? The author does not sufficiently address this.

5. This leads to perhaps the most glaring weakness of One Way Loveit is not based on careful biblical exegesis. Very little scriptural analysis is found, and most of the passages cited are not handled well. Philippians 3:7-9 (p. 145), John 3:20 (p. 147), James 4:1-2 (p. 151) and Romans 5:8 (p. 175) are used but none carries the freight the author wants it to handle. By taking scriptural passages out of context, rather than carefully examining the pertinent texts, Tchividjian manages to reduce every problem to law and find every solution in grace. This reductionism leaves out a vast storehouse of truth while narrowing the Christian life to grace, and grace alone.

6. This is all the more frustrating because Tchividjian sees even attempts at “application” as legalism, therefore he refuses to give us some “how-to’s” in order to experience grace because he fears he would be taking us back to law (pp. 154-155). He has boxed himself into a “grace” corner and he cannot find a way out.

I was conflicted when I read One Way Love. Tchividjian is spot-on concerning much of his analysis. Yet he lacks a balanced, biblical understanding of the sanctification process perhaps because he attempts to filter Scripture through his own experience. At any rate since the author does not make a sound argument drawn clearly from Scripture, his ideas need to be carefully challenged with an open Bible. Followed at face value many of these ideas will lead to an unbalanced Christian life.

Reviewed by Gary E. Gilley, Pastor-teacher, Southern View Chapel

http://www.svchapel.org/resources/book-reviews/4-christian-living/870-one-way-love-inexhaustible-grace-for-an-exhausted-world-by-tullian-tchividjian-colorado-springs-david-c-cook-2013-236-pp-paper-14-99

One Way Love, Inexhaustible Grace for An Exhausted World

One Way Love, Inexhaustible Grace for An Exhausted World

by Tullian Tchividjian

(Colorado Springs: David C. Cook, 2013) 236 pp., paper $14.99

Tchividjian is tired and exhausted (pp. 28, 198) and believes that others are too in their attempts to perform up to God’s standards (pp. 20-22, 62, 147). Many, he believes, think that God loves them only if they are changing and growing (pp. 30, 52, 199) and thus they conceive of God’s love as conditional (pp. 30, 52, 199). The author thinks that Jesus came to liberate us from this demand to measure up (p. 36). And since even when we are at our best we do things that need forgiveness (p. 54), our only hope is found in God’s grace. Instead of living by grace most Christians apparently operate on the basis of law, attempting to follow a set of rules to obtain the favor of God. But instead of improving, people get worse when the law is laid down, for law reveals sin but is powerless to remove it (p. 91). What we must understand is that everything we need is found in Christ (p. 188) and, therefore, our lives rest on God’s love of us, not on our love for Him (p. 115).

Tchividjian is rightly concerned that we should not preach “humanity and it improved” instead of “Christ and Him crucified” (p. 131). In all of this he is not against obedience (p. 129) or even rules, which he sees as necessary for life to function. But keeping rules (p. 194) is not a condition for God’s approval (p. 155). Good works are important however, but not for God. Rather they are important to our neighbors (pp. 200-202).

In all of the things Tchivijian is on the mark but there are concerns:

1. He often makes unbalanced statements such as.

“Grace doesn’t make demands, it just gives” (p. 33). Yet God makes demands, for example, after detailing God’s grace in Ephesians 1-3 Paul immediately writes, “I implore you to walk in a manner worthy of your calling” (4:1).

He quotes Steve Brown claiming that children who run from grace always come back (p. 57). Really? Always?

We apparently will never be grateful because we are told to be (p. 153), yet does not God command us to be thankful (Col 3:15-17)? Did the Lord not know that commands are bad motivators and produce legalists?

The author claims grace got Jesus killed (pp. 170-174), but the Gospels present other motives, such as claiming to be God, challenging the power structure in Israel, and exposing the sins of spiritual leaders.

His claim that “moralism will produce immorality” (p. 193) is a strange and unprovable comment.

His statement that “only unbelief is called sin by Christ” fails to note Jesus’ condemnation of many sins (see Matt 5-7, 23). Others could be cited but these communicate the idea.

2. Tchividjian forces grace into biblical accounts where better explanations are at least debatable. Was it really on the basis of grace, as the author claims, that the Prodigal Son was given his inheritance (p. 42)? And does God forgive unconditionally—without repentance (p. 175)? First John 1:9 seems to contradict this when it lays down the condition of confession for forgiveness.

3. Attempting to explain or define grace is a problem it seems (see pp. 103-104), so the author most often turns to examples from his experience and many of these examples give us deep pause. Tchividjian believes it was grace to give his disobedient son his phone back after open defiance (pp. 160-162), and it was grace for a friend to buy his son a new car after he got drunk and wrecked his old one (pp. 164-165). And it was grace for his father to give him blank checks to fund his rebellious lifestyle as a young man (p. 56). Whether these are examples of grace or bad judgment could be debated, but of course in these stories all turned out well. However, this is basing our actions on pragmatism not Scripture (pp. 186-187). And in what world are Mel Gibson and Bernie Madoff examples of those whom God has pursued to give His grace (p. 132)? In this regard it was sad to see [COLOR=Green]Tchividjian trot out Brennan Manning as a champion of grace[/COLOR] (pp. 43-44, 210, 226). For the author to even consider Manning, a former Roman Catholic priest, a Christian calls into question his understanding of the gospel.

4. Tchividjian makes a number of excellent observations about law, especially offering Machen’s quote “A low view of law always produces legalism—a high view of law makes a person a seeker after grace” (p. 96). And he rightly shows that law cannot heal us spiritually, rather it exposes us and informs us of God’s nature. But if God’s commands backfire and actually provide the opposite of their intention has God failed when He makes demands? This is at least implied in Tchividjian’s comments concerning God giving the law to Israel, Jesus demanding his disciples to take up their cross, Paul’s criticism of the Corinthians, and even the initial prohibition to Adam and Eve (pp. 86-87). Doesn’t the Lord understand law and human nature? The author does not sufficiently address this.

5. This leads to perhaps the most glaring weakness of One Way Loveit is not based on careful biblical exegesis. Very little scriptural analysis is found, and most of the passages cited are not handled well. Philippians 3:7-9 (p. 145), John 3:20 (p. 147), James 4:1-2 (p. 151) and Romans 5:8 (p. 175) are used but none carries the freight the author wants it to handle. By taking scriptural passages out of context, rather than carefully examining the pertinent texts, Tchividjian manages to reduce every problem to law and find every solution in grace. This reductionism leaves out a vast storehouse of truth while narrowing the Christian life to grace, and grace alone.

6. This is all the more frustrating because Tchividjian sees even attempts at “application” as legalism, therefore he refuses to give us some “how-to’s” in order to experience grace because he fears he would be taking us back to law (pp. 154-155). He has boxed himself into a “grace” corner and he cannot find a way out.

I was conflicted when I read One Way Love. Tchividjian is spot-on concerning much of his analysis. Yet he lacks a balanced, biblical understanding of the sanctification process perhaps because he attempts to filter Scripture through his own experience. At any rate since the author does not make a sound argument drawn clearly from Scripture, his ideas need to be carefully challenged with an open Bible. Followed at face value many of these ideas will lead to an unbalanced Christian life.

Reviewed by Gary E. Gilley, Pastor-teacher, Southern View Chapel

http://www.svchapel.org/resources/book-reviews/4-christian-living/870-one-way-love-inexhaustible-grace-for-an-exhausted-world-by-tullian-tchividjian-colorado-springs-david-c-cook-2013-236-pp-paper-14-99